Back in the Saddle

     I remember when I was a little girl our neighbor’s horse got out.  My dad found it close to our house and made my oldest brother ride it back to the neighbor’s (about 3 miles on a gravel road through a swamp and he was seven.)  It was a young horse and hadn’t been broken yet, and my brother was riding bare back.  The horse threw him onto the gravel road.  My dad and I were following in the car.  My dad calmly and quietly got out of the car, walked over to my brother and asked if he was OK.  My brother said, “Yes.”  My dad said, “Get back on the horse.”  My brother said, “I don’t want to.”  My dad gave him “The Look”.  My brother got back on the horse and rode it to its owner’s house.

     In the car my father explained “the situation” to me.  “It wasn’t a nice thing to do, making your brother get back on that horse, but it had to be done.  For one, if you let the horse get its way so easily, they’ll never be able to break him.  The second thing is, that scared your brother.  He needed to face his fear right then before it became too big to deal with.  If he had not gotten back in the saddle, then every time something scared him or if he failed someway in life, he would just give up.  And that is no way to live your life.”

     That being said, I went to class Wednesday.  I did tell them that I had hurt my shoulder and had to be careful.  I didn’t mention the dislocation part.  I didn’t want to “scare” them or make my training partner feel any worse.  He already feels bad enough.  I did what I could with my right arm cradled and earned the nick name “The One Arm Bandit”.  Which is appropriate considering it was my first time “Back in The Saddle”, so to speak.

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6 Responses to Back in the Saddle

  1. If he had not gotten back in the saddle, then every time something scared him or if he failed someway in life, he would just give up. And that is no way to live your life.”
    ————–
    The flaw in that logic being: bro got back up on the horse because he was scared of dad.

    • Tree Frog says:

      After a while of that though, it often changes to “the boy gets back on the horse because he knows that failing once or being hurt a bit doesn’t mean you’ve failed with finality”.

      I’m not disagreeing with your point entirely, but it’s sometimes different for boys dealing with their fathers. The fear you mention isn’t usually fear – it’s more of a mixture of awe and respect and an intimidating example to follow. Disappointing the father is the bigger motivator than being afraid of the father for most boys (my brothers, my cousins, friends and I being my experiences).

      • Tree Frog – “Disappointing the father is the bigger motivator than being afraid of the father for most boys.” That’s a very good point. That was my oldest brother Scott, and he was always closest to my dad. So, you are probably right. Scott is the nicest guy you could ever meet. A total sweet heart who you can trust and depend on. Out of the four of us, he is most like my dad.

    • Savage One – ROFLMAO = You are probably right! My brother’s not afraid of horses but, he dislikes horses to this day.

  2. Ashley says:

    hahah, I fell off my family’s horse when I was 7! It was actually my birthday. I wasn’t hurt and it was a trained horse; I think he just went into a gallop and I wasn’t holding on or something. I did not want to get back on and my mom didn’t make me.

    I still managed to take plenty of risks and face plenty of fears throughout my life! I appreciate the metaphor (don’t make excuses, face fears, and just do it), but “get back on the saddle” in the literal sense — well, I’m not sure my 7 year old self would have appreciated it. Being forced to get back on probably would have been much more traumatizing than being thrown! I guess your bro was a tougher 7 year old than I was. 🙂

    Glad you’re “back in the saddle”. Make sure you take care of your shoulder!

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